How to survive job rejection

KHM Recruitment
“True success is overcoming the fear of being unsuccessful.” - Paul Sweeney, Author

As humans, none of us enjoy the feeling of being rejected, whether it is being rejected for a mortgage or after a job interview! The bottom line is that rejection is never a pleasant feeling and one that can deter so many of us from achieving our aspirations, as we refrain from putting ourselves into situations that will lead to that feeling of being unsuccessful.

Rejection is however an aspect of everyday life and something that we will all experience. We should therefore learn how to cope with it.

Whether you’re a graduate that is soon to delve into the competitive job market, a school leaver trying to find your first entry level role or you’re an experienced professional looking for that next role to further your career it is most likely that you will experience rejection on your journey to finding that new role!

If you have recently experienced rejection from a job, do not take it personally, but read our advice on how to learn from it!



Gaining Feedback  

Contacting the employer who rejected you always seems like a frightening action! But, this feedback could end up being extremely useful to landing your dream role. If you have gone through a recruiter you may find that this feedback is easier to obtain, as they will generally have a relationship with the employer. Nonetheless, if you have applied directly there is no harm in asking (you have after all taken the time to apply or attend the interview).

You can email or phone your contact, we would advise either a week following your interview or when the advised timeframe for hearing back from the contact has ended. Make sure you stress how important their feedback is to you, your enthusiasm for the role and thank them for their time.  Creating a good impression is still important, as they may retain your details for any future vacancies.

Some employers will not offer feedback, but there is no harm in following up with another email, if you do not receive a response. Just make sure not to pester them or come across as rude. If you also need them to elaborate on their feedback there is no harm asking further questions.

Remember this is your chance to learn where you may have gone wrong and what your strengths are. You can then use this feedback for your next application or interview.

Gaining Experience

Firstly, ask yourself these questions – Was I lacking crucial experience or skills needed for the role? What skills or experience did the successful candidate have?

Any graduate or school leaver has heard the phrase “you interviewed well, but there were other candidates with more experience?”. This can be extremely frustrating to hear and you end up asking yourself “how can I gain the experience, if no one will give me the opportunity?”.

There are ways that you can build up your CV and working part time or being unemployed is an opportunity to gain the skills that you need, as you have free time. Ways to gain that experience could be volunteering for a charity, the local community or a business. Businesses are always keen to take on volunteers and this could be your chance to gain valuable experience. Internships are also a great way to boost the skills on your CV.   



Improving your Chances

Other ways of improving your chances of landing that dream role could be:
·         Attending CV workshops
·         Signing up with recruitment agencies
·         Signing up to job boards
·         Using social media – social media is becoming extremely popular for networking and employers are using it as a platform to advertise jobs.
          This can therefore be a way for you to utilise the time you spend on twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram
·         Network – Speak to friends, families and acquaintances and find out how they got to their job and if they have any advice or contacts
​           that you can speak to

Remember to stay positive! It can be disheartening being rejected for a job, but if you keep trying and continue to build your experience then you will land that role. It is important to remember your skillset /experience and make sure you are being realistic for the roles that you are applying for. Nonetheless, if you keep trying you will land that job!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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New Director joins KHM

KHM Recruitment
KHM Recruitment Ltd are pleased to announce that Stephen Maley has joined KHM as Director and Co-owner of the business as of 1st March 2017. 
 
Steve has 18 years London & UK wide recruitment experience where he has worked across both the Banking & Financial Services sector and Commerce & Industry within his career. Steve has specialised in recruiting within the Accountancy & Finance field and for the latter part of his career has focused on middle management to board level appointments across a range of businesses from start ups through to FTSE100 listed companies.
 
Julie Jennings, founder of KHM commented "I am delighted that Steve has joined the KHM team and I look forward to working closely with him to drive the KHM business further forward as we seek to continue our growth story over the coming years".
 
Steve commented "I am excited by the opportunity to work with Julie and the team to continue to build the KHM brand and deliver exceptional service to both new and existing clients. Having worked within larger corporate recruitment companies for the last 10 years, i am looking forward to being part of a smaller and entrepruenerial business and having the chance to add real value to a business that has so much potential"
 
In addition to the helping run the business, Steve will focus on growing our existing Accountancy & Finance recruitment offering within our chosen geographies and markets at all levels from entry through to board Finance Director / Chief Financial Officer appointments. 
 
You can get in touch with Steve at steve@khmrecruitment.co.uk or 07841 022262 and Julie Jennings at julie@khmrecruitment.co.uk or 07789754589 with any questions or assistance
 
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Hello Monday

KHM Recruitment
It’s been quite the weekend.  Household chores, driving the kids around, visiting family, preparing for Christmas.. and now here we are.  The start of another week. It’s Monday morning and the day that so many of us seem to dread.    
 
In virtually any workplace however, Monday mornings are the most important part of the week. They set the pace and mood of the week to come.
 
So here we go with some tips to help you start your week in the right way.  It’s about time you started to embrace Monday and celebrate the start of a brand new week!
 
Start your day fresh and start it early
Try going to sleep early on a Sunday night so you can wake up refreshed and early on Monday morning. Rejuvenate your body and soul with a quick session of exercise and meditation. Make sure you eat a healthy and nutritious breakfast to help generate positive thoughts and give you the energy required to complete pending tasks.
 
Be happy (or 'look' happy!)
‘Dress to impress’ and remember to smile. If you don’t feel it, fake it! It’s important that you refuse to allow any negativity left over from the weekend show itself. 
 
Arrive early
Set off from home early to avoid traffic and parking hassles. Arriving early to work and arriving calm and relaxed, will give you the necessary time to prepare yourself for any upcoming meetings or tackle any unexpected news or issues that may crop up.
 
Organise your desk
If you didn’t have time to do it on Friday evening before leaving work, make sure you do it first thing on a Monday morning. Organise your files, your desk and your desktop. A clutter-free work place will help get you on the right track to managing your day.   
 
Scan your emails
Screen your inbox to check for urgent messages. Do not let the fun emails and inspirational quotes eat up valuable time. Organise your mail box by following the management mantra of “Do it, Dump it or Delegate it”. This will help you to be more organised.
 
Be polite
When replying to your emails, make sure they are friendly and to the point. If you are feeling busy and/or stressed out, make sure that it does not come across in your email. Your emails should always be polite and positive!
 
Prioritise
On a typical Monday morning there will be many things on the agenda ranging from meetings to calls and emails that will all call out for your attention. You have to set your priorities right to keep your day organised.
 
Say “no”
Your friends and colleagues will sometimes be looking for your time or needing to ask a favour. You must learn when it is necessary to say a polite “no” to allow yourself the time to focus on, and complete, your own workload. 
 
Take time to meet and greet your boss and colleagues
Pass your positive energy on to your co-workers. Greet them with a smile and take the time wish your colleagues a ‘good morning’. 
 
Don’t rush
Even though you may have what appears to be an endless ‘to do’ list first thing on Monday, make sure you approach each matter carefully. Rushing and risking making mistakes may cause bigger problems in the long run.  Pay attention to the tasks in front of you and give them enough attention and time.
 
It’s Monday.  It’s also a new day. A new week. And with it comes a new opportunity for something fantastic to happen!  Make it a good one.

Published by Julie Jones
 
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Social Media And The Job Hunter

KHM Recruitment
The time has come where most of us are more than aware of how relevant social media and social networking is in both our business and our private lives.  Social media is the intersection of technology and human interaction.  It continues to embed itself in our lives and it is a well known fact that more and more of us seem to love to connect with each other. 

Traditional recruitment methods have been swallowed up by the prominence of social media and it has become a quick, easy and inexpensive way for employers to conduct a "background check" on prospective job applicants, utilising social media to verify the facts on resumes, to check out knowledge and attitudes expressed publicly (careful here everyone!!), and evaluate communications skills.

                                                                   
              
























Increasingly, employers are also making use of social media to find qualified applicants and it is proving to be indispensable in identifying good job candidates.  LinkedIn, is the number one social network for job searches and social networking has therefore become a critical tool in your job search because it is being used more and more by recruiters.
 
Employers and recruiters are using social media more and using conventional job boards less with LinkedIn continuing to dominate the social networks used for recruiting. Facebook is the largest social network of them all and is a fantastic tool used to promote an employer as a great place to work.  Whilst it is less popular than LinkedIn for finding job seekers, there are still a considerable number of job posts seen on both Facebook and Twitter and the role they can play in the job search must not be underestimated in any way.  
 
Facebook is a social networking website that allows users to add friends and send them messages, and update their personal profiles to notify friends about themselves. Users can join networks organised by city, workplace, and school or college.  Like LinkedIn, Facebook also offers company pages and for an organisation, it is a perfect marketing and recruitment tool.  Both Facebook and LinkedIn provide a platform that helps those who are looking for work as well as those would like to simply network professionally. 
 
Social media helps recruiters get a clear idea of who you are and what you have done before they even talk with you. They can also pick up clues about your personality and how you might fit into their corporate culture.
 
Within your use of social media, employers and recruiters can obtain a good indication of:
  • How well you communicate (your spelling, punctuation, and grammar as well as your ability to clearly communicate ideas)
  • Your work history and education
  • Your industry knowledge
  • Your use of alcohol
  • Your use of illegal substances
  • Your use of profanity
  • How you spend your non-work time 
 
Other popular social networks include Twitter.com which is a free social networking and microblogging service that enables its users to send and read messages known as tweets. Tweets are text-based posts displayed on the author's profile page and delivered to the author's subscribers who are known as followers.
 
Blogs are usually maintained by an individual who makes regular entries describing events, or posting other material such as graphics or video. Entries are commonly displayed in reverse-chronological order. Many blogs provide commentary or news on a particular subject whilst others resemble more personal online diaries. A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, Web pages, and other media related to its topic and readers have the ability to leave comments in an interactive format. 
 
Of course, there are many other sites comprising social media such as Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ and as technology continues to advance at a rapid rate, we can only guess at what the future will bring..

Published by Julie Jones
 
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When Its Time For A Career Change

KHM Recruitment
It’s happened to many people in their careers – the job you thought you’d love when you were in University isn’t what you imagined. A job you’ve had for a while isn’t what it used to be. Maybe you’ve outgrown the job, or as you’ve gained experience, the type of work you’re passionate about has changed. Sometimes the best solution is to consider a career change. 





Recognise the signs:

Boredom or Loss of Passion: There are ebbs and flows for everyone when it comes to how passionate they are about the work they’re doing. However, if you find yourself feeling this way all the time, and can’t identify anything about your job you are passionate about, this could be your first sign to start investigating other opportunities.

Poor professional growth: There are a number of ways we can grow in our careers and be rewarded for our efforts. Perhaps you’re looking for great mentorship and personal growth, or maybe it’s something as simple as getting a raise you deserve. No one ever wants to feel like their career has stalled out and their current position isn’t helping with future goals. 

No opportunities to grow your “personal brand:” If your employer isn’t making use of your strengths and allowing you to be your authentic self, you may have a hard time standing out and doing great work.

But simply being dissatisfied with your current role or career doesn’t help you determine what’s next. To do that, figure out what you’ve been most passionate about in your previous positions and what work environments have made you feel the most energized. From there, you can start to plan what your ultimate goal is, and the steps needed to get there. 

Step 1: Pivot to a new career by translating your skills
Don’t sell yourself short by preparing a traditional resume in reverse chronological order that highlights your job duties at each role. Instead, focus on the skills and accomplishments you have gained throughout your career that would apply to a new opportunity. Are you wanting to transition into sales? Showcase your accomplishments that impacted sales or revenue at your last job, or your ability to persuade. Think in broad terms about what skills you use day to day, and how those would make you better in your new career.

Step 2: Acquire Experience
There are many opportunities to acquire experience that don’t come from a job. For example, if you want to go into programming, but past positions haven’t provided this opportunity, it’s still possible to deepen your abilities and create a portfolio of work on your own. Prepare for your desired career by studying programming, for instance, and building your own app, or even cross-training with other departments at your present job.

Step 3: Move to an Intermediate Job that Blends Disciplines
It’s possible that you’ll find yourself in a situation where your past jobs and your dream career have very few shared skills in common, making it difficult to move directly from one career to another. Many times a conversation with your manager about your career goals can open up opportunities to gain experience in other fields and help get you started in the right direction

Step 4: Set Appropriate Expectations
Once you’ve acquired the skills needed for your career transition, or worked to reframe your current skills for the new role, it’s important to set appropriate expectations for the positions and income you will be qualified for in your new career. You may have to start at an entry level position, or one requiring much less professional experience than you possess, if your skills do not translate directly. You may take a pay cut in the short term, but often times you can get your foot in the door and count on your previous experience to help move your career forward.

Career changes are common, especially as technology and social media are reinventing the way many parts of business work. Proper planning can make even a major transition an exhilarating life experience that will re-energise your work and positively affect your life. While you’re looking for that dream job, check out KHM Recruitment's job openings and see what skills you can translate into your next career.

Published by Julie Jones
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Turning An Anxious Job Seeker Into An Interview Pro

KHM Recruitment
Just the thought of an interview can push a naturally anxious person over the edge. Putting these personality types into a stressful situation, where self-doubt kicks in, makes it extra difficult for them to have a successful interview. 

Recent studies have shown that almost 50 percent of job applicants wonder if the hiring manager is looking for someone like them. That’s a lot of pressure for anyone, but especially for those with high anxiety. 

In addition to this, 60 percent of job seekers have had a poor hiring experience in the past. No one wants to be placed back into a negative situation and worrying about past experiences can cause anxiety and create unneccesary hurdles and obstacles that prevent you from moving forward and achieving your full potential.

                    

People with high anxiety are often stereotyped as those who are quiet, can’t stop fidgeting, or have trouble looking others in the eyes but this is not always the case.  Often, people who are really anxious have no outward nervous tendencies or entirely unexpected ones.

One thing they typically have in common is that job seekers with anxious impulses fear that they’re not good enough for the job. This jolt to the confidence can make anyone feel nervous in an interview, so applicants who are susceptible to high anxiety feel even more stress towards the process. 

Most specialists or therapists will tell you that its important not to attempt to help someone with anxiety get over their fears. Rather, it’s important to coach them on how to deal with these anxieties during stressful situations — like an interview for example.

The following tips can help even the most anxious job seeker work their way through their next interview with a degree of confidence and ease.  

Harness the calming effects of breathing

Practice focusing on ways to breathe so your nerves don’t get the best of you. People who are highly sensitive to stress feel like a second of deep breathing is an entire minute. It's okay to take a moment before answering a question and to take a couple of breaths whilst you gather your thoughts. Interviewers appreciate candidates who give themselves a moment to answer each question with deliberation and confidence. Nothing says that more than controlled and intentional breathing. 

Practice calming your heart rate and nerves through breathing. Breathe for five seconds in through the nose, and five seconds out discretely through the mouth. As the interviewer is speaking, you can continue to do this to keep your mind from racing and to prevent anxiety from escalating before it’s time to respond. 

Practice through role play

It’s extremely difficult to feel prepared for an interview because we never know exactly what’s to come. But you can help yourself exponentially by running through mock interviews. Many recruitment agencies like KHM Recruitment will offer support in this area and can give you advice on how to envisage different scenarios to bring awareness to your posture, speech, and fidgeting habits. 

When we’re anxious, we often talk quickly and are too distracted by our nerves to focus on listening skills. Even bad posture can play into the shakiness we present in both posture and voice. As these responses deteriorate, our anxiety increases.

After role playing an interview situation, consider how you felt about your body language and rate of speech. Chances are, if you hold yourself confidently and remain conscious of the speed of your responses, you will realise that your are much less anxious. 

This new mindfulness of their body will help calm you down before panic sets in during an actual interview. If you are not yet confident, repeat the exercise a few times and this will give you to the opportunity to make proper posture and confident verbal cues, a more natural response.

Review common questions that come up during interviews. Think about the many different forms these questions may come in. For example, 'what’s one negative about yourself' versus 'name something you need to improve on'. While these sound different, the basic information the interviewer is looking for is the same — don’t let anxiety creep up in response to a simple rephrasing. 

Train yourself to listen carefully for the intent of the question, take a breath, and answer accordingly. Practice feeling natural, and not too rehearsed when answering these questions. When nerves kick in, so does a robotic, forced voice that takes away from your true personality.

Reassure yourself that you are ready

Believe in yourself and reassure yourself that you are, in fact, a potential candidate and that you are more than prepared for the upcoming interview. Go over everything that you have been practicing and make a list of some of the more important facts that you focused on in your practice interview. 

If you are having trouble thinking of these strong moments, try and think of specifics such as: what’s a physical habit you are now able to control that you could not previously? How will you calm yourself down before answering a question? Do you feel confident now that you will be able to repeat what the interviewer says to you? Do you now have the confidence to make eye contact?

People with anxious tendencies just need the right calming tools to help them feel prepared for the interview process. The key to success is believing that you already have what it takes, you just need to exercise this confidence and control.  One breath at a time.

So, do you have any tips for helping anxious job seekers? Alternatively, perhaps you are on the hunt for a new opportunity and would like to register with KHM Recruitment? Either way we would love to hear from you so feel free to contact the KHM team on 01763 248337 or email us on info@khmrecruitment.co.uk.

Published by Julie Jones
 
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The Fine Art Of Balancing Work Children And Family Life

KHM Recruitment
Working after you become a parent is a balancing act that may take some time to get right.  It will definitely take some time to get used to!
 
So is it possible to have it all, to juggle everything and achieve a good work-life balance?
 
Maybe. Unlikely, to be honest.  But you certainly stand a better chance of doing a lot and doing it well by following some simple planning tips and strategies
 
It's not easy doing any one of these things – full-time work, parenting, studying – but to do them all, you will need to begin by getting organised and surrounding yourself with support.



BE ORGANISED.  BE SPECIFIC — Make a to-do list or several.  Working parents have to stay up later to make sure they are ready for the next day.  No matter how tired you are, you have to think about tomorrow. Be sure about what you want to do.  Make sure you are clear on what your goal is.               
 
GET UP EARLY.  WORK OUT A GAME PLAN — It’s not always easy but getting up before the rest of the house is the best way to get uninterrupted time to work on any project or job. For brand new parents, this is of course, that middle of the night moment when the baby is actually sleeping but you are not!  Figure out exactly what you need to reach your goals and make sure you are being realistic.  Think about resources such as money, time and tools.
 
WORK EVERYWHERE. BREAK EVERYTHING DOWN — It’s amazing the amount of work you can do while taking a walk or driving and thinking. That’s when you can solve a problem or come up with a new way to earn money. It’s the not the best time to take notes though so be careful with this one!
 
CARRY A NOTEBOOK. IT’S ALL ABOUT TIME MANAGEMENT — Don’t leave home without a notebook and pens. You never know when an idea will strike or when you will find some free time to work on a project or new idea. Keep a diary or calendar with important dates.  When you know what is coming up, you can plan around it and you can set aside specific time for work and identify what you are going to do when.  Everything will seem far less daunting if you break it all down into smaller pieces.  Whether it is a list or an action plan, write it down.  You won’t remember it all otherwise.  Plus you can feel good as you tick things off as you accomplish them. 

FINE TUNE YOUR WORKLOAD AND PRIORITISE: You will know you are doing too much when the quality of what you are doing is not as good as you would like it to be.  There is a balance and everyone needs to find what that is. No one has an endless reserve of time and energy so work out what is high priority and what can wait.  Learn to accept that you cannot do everything.
 
NETWORK: Sometimes the greatest support is just having someone to talk to.  Network with like-minded parents.  It will help to keep you on track and maintain your focus.
 
LOOK AFTER YOUR HEALTH: You will perform better if you are fit, healthy and eat well. It's not just vanity, it's about being productive in all areas of your life.
 
SEE THE FUNNY SIDE: You have got to have time to be silly. You need to have a sense of humour because things aren't always going to go 100% right.  Having a sense of humour will help you not take things so seriously.
 
AN EXTRA PAIR OF HANDS WILL HELP.  DELEGATE: Paying for a part time nanny or au pair can be a good investment and provide you with a better quality of life. This is a tough one for a few reasons.  However, if you subscribe to the ‘no-one can do it as well/efficiently/thoroughly/effectively as me school of thought, then you are almost certainty going to fail on this one.  Ask your family to take on some of your chores, arrange for a childcare rota with friends, do what is necessary but know that this is an important one so you have to make it happen.
 
It might be that you need to give consideration to changing the way in which you work. 
 
Consider taking part in a job share if the opportunity presents itself.  Sharing a job can help you to focus on work when you are in the office and on family when you are at home. 
 
Discuss home-working with your employer. For example, negotiate leaving work early enough to spend time with your children before they go to bed and perhaps work additional time at home once the children are asleep. 
 
Make the most of your right to request flexible working with your employer. When you discuss returning to work after maternity leave, make a strong case for working less hours.
 
Consider working part time rather than full time.  Speak to your employer and find out if it is possible to take a shorter lunch break so you can leave work earlier.
 
It’s definitely not easy being a parent, having a career, running a home and somehow making time for yourself as well, but it can be done.  With the right action plan, a lot of passion, an exorbitant amount of drive and hard work, having it all might not be such a fantasy after all.  

Published by Julie Jones
 
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How The Job Search Has Changed

KHM Recruitment
It’s a cliché of course.  One of the oldest even.  Time flies and things change.  It’s sometimes fascinating and always interesting to look at the ways in which we have evolved over the years.  Things change and we rarely question why.  It’s only when you compare the old with the new that you begin to see how much we have changed and then wonder at our advancement or perhaps start to question if it was really for the best?

These days, nearly everything is technology based.  Businesses are trying to cut out face-to-face interaction with internet banking, scan your own at supermarkets and customer service via internet chat. We are slowly but surely cutting out the ‘personal touch’.  Is there a real danger that, over time, we will forget how to interact with people altogether?  
 

If we turn back the clock and take a look at how job hunting 30 years ago what do we see? 
 
  • There was plenty of work and less competition.  There was no need for third level education for the majority of jobs as you were more than likely trained on the job.
  • People left school at a younger age, usually around 15 years of age and usually found a job straight out of school.  
  • There were lots of apprenticeships.
  • A lot less pressure to excel in the job due to less competition.  Employers retained their employees and job security was higher.
  • You usually found a job through a contact of yours or another family member, or even through the classifieds in a newspaper.
Today, when it comes to job hunting, it is not even necessary to leave the house.  All that you need is access to the internet and every job vacancy imaginable around the world can be found with ease.  What are the other major differences job seekers encounter today?
 
  • Today there is much more competition.  Companies can afford to be selective so a third level education is practically essential.
  • Those who leave school prematurely will find it extremely difficult to find employment. Companies want skills and they want experience.
  • There are far less apprenticeship opportunities in today’s jo market and the recent recession reduced job opportunities in many sectors.
  • Competition in the workplace is extremely high; employers know that there are plenty of other people out there who are qualified to do your job.  There are even 90 day work trials so there is added pressure on employees if they want to achieve job security.

Job hunting has changed significantly even in the past 10 years and even if the last time you were looking for a new job was only a few years ago, it is necessary to reacquaint yourself with how things have changed.

The Internet has shifted the way in which everything works. There are aspects of your resume and online profile that can easily date you if you don't take steps to update your approach. This puts you in danger of rejection before you even manage to get an interview.

The CV: Employers are spending little time reviewing CV’s nowadays. Since many companies cut personnel to save on costs, hiring managers and human resources departments have less time these days. This has increased workloads, which sometimes pushes the hiring process farther down the list of priorities. Because of that, you have about 30 seconds to make an impression on your CV.

Career Summaries: Provide a specific summary of your top skills and achievements. Think about what you've done and where you've worked. What stands out the most and what are you recognised for as a professional?

Job Descriptions: In the past, you could simply list your duties on your resume for each position, basically mirroring your actual job description. This no longer works. Instead of stating your past, you need to take the employer's viewpoint. What about your work would they be most interested in? Focusing on the company's perspective allows you to demonstrate what you can do for them, which is what they care about.

Keywords: These are typically nouns or phrases that you see repeatedly in a job posting or under "Qualifications" or "Requirements." You may think it's clear in your resume that you possess those skills, but you need to carefully cross-reference it with the posting. Have you used the exact words in your resume that apply to your background? Every time you apply to a job, you need to perform this check. Do not use the same resume for every submission because it won't help you get in the door.

Categories: In addition to a career summary, basic information, such as your work history and education, are just as important. However, listing information, such as basic computer skills and "references available on request," date you quickly. Unless these elements are requested in a job posting, you don't need them.

Gaps and short employment periods: While these are no longer uncommon, you need to be transparent. If it's not apparent why there is a big gap in your work history, you should consider how to address it because an employer may just move on. Their time is valuable, so make your resume worthwhile. Give them the information. You don't need to go into excruciatingly personal detail, but it's a good idea to address layoffs if you've had a series of them and personal issues that have resulted in work gaps.

Internet. If an employer likes your resume, they may do a Google search to make sure that what they see is positive, and that you are active and professional online. In order to proactively tackle potential issues, do yourself a favour and Google your name. Make sure that your LinkedIn profile is showing up high in the list of search results. If it's not, take a look at your profile and make sure you're using keywords throughout it that apply to you and your field.

Networking. Many years ago, most job seekers applied blindly. Now, you should approach your search by applying to job postings and networking. If you only take the former approach, you are probably missing out on opportunities. You need to do both. Networking isn't for everyone, but a lot of it can now be done online if you're not inclined toward in-person events. Find people who are doing what you want to be doing and talk to them about what they do. Ask for introductions if you need to. This is considered normal now.

LinkedIn. If you're not already using LinkedIn, it's time to get on board. And it's no longer enough to create a bare-bones profile. Complete it because people will notice when they search for you via Google or on LinkedIn itself. This medium helps you establish a personal brand beyond your resume and can include additional information that doesn't belong or fit on a resume. Write a summary that highlights your professional accomplishments and shows your personal side. For example, why did you choose your career path? Get recommendations as these add credibility and can result in interviews. It's like an easy reference check before calling you in to interview.

Cover letters. These are not as common anymore but they are still used in certain fields and by some companies. They are mostly used for entry-level jobs, as well as some midlevel roles. Unless you're applying to a very conservative organisation, or in a traditional field, write less than one page and use bullet points to offset the skills and value you offer. Instead of listing what you've done, summarize relevant examples from your work history. It should not repeat your resume. It should offer new information or dive deeper than your resume.

Over the years, and with the growth of technology, many things about job searching has changed. If you want to be successful in your job hunt, you need to use tools and resume guidance to ensure your approach is sound.  The internet offers a wealth of information and opportunity and social media sites, job boards and forums can be indispensable as can recruitment agencies like KHM Recruitment Ltd .  

For more information on how to maximise your potential and land the job you are looking for, give the KHM team a call today on 01763 248337.
 
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What Hiring Managers Are Looking For

KHM Recruitment
So you just got the call you’ve been waiting for.  A hiring manager is interested in interviewing you in the next few days. You are most likely full of excitement and also, like most job seekers, you’re probably more than a little apprehensive too, unsure of what to expect during the interview.

Job seekers do not have to be left completely in the dark. There are many characteristics hiring managers look for specifically when trying to fill a role. Some of these characteristics include qualification, cultural fit and flexibility.

                          
 
Basically, hiring managers want to see if the applicant is qualified for the role based on the preferred qualifications. When looking at the job description, a candidate's technical experience and interpersonal skills should tick 75% or more of the job duties and requirements, with room to grow and tackle new challenges. An applicant who has experience in 100% of the job requirements is quite often not seen as the ideal candidate. A hiring manager would be concerned that at 100% experience level, the employee would quickly get bored of their job and soon be out looking for a more challenging position. 
 
Hiring managers are looking for a qualified candidate that can fit into the culture of the team and company. Teamwork is vital in most working environments therefore it is crucial for a manager to get this right.
 
Finally, hiring managers are looking for candidates who are flexible. Naturally, not every task and responsibility is listed on the job description. Hiring managers are looking for candidates who have the flexibility to complete tasks and activities as needed. From covering for a colleague unexpectedly out of the office, to learning a new skill because of a change in project scope, hiring managers need someone they can depend on for future changes, and flexibility is key.

While no one can see into the future, identifying what types of characteristics hiring managers are looking for is not as hard as one may think. Qualified candidates who are a great fit with the team and organisation, and that demonstrate their flexibility will find space in nearly every organisation. Candidates should take their job-search strategy further and research the companies, positions and teams they could be working with to ensure the right match.
 
So during your next interview, try to relax and be yourself. This isn’t the easiest thing to do when your dream job is at stake, but a good place to start is to ditch those interview answers you memorised and attempt to respond to the interviewer’s questions in your own words.
 
Instead of saying “I’m a perfectionist,” for example, tell them about a time when you used your unique skills to perfect a difficult paper, project or proposal. This will most certainly help you stand out in the crowd.
Identify your weak spots and work on improving them. For instance, if you have a fantastic resume, amazing experience and top-notch credentials, but you tend to avoid eye contact during interviews, practice making eye contact several days before your next interview.
 
Try doing mock interviews with someone you trust (contact KHM Recruitment as they offer this kind of support as a standard service).  After they “interview” you, ask them to describe the way you come across, then work to get better. Do you slouch? Break eye contact? Ramble? Roll your eyes? Lack enthusiasm? The more you practice, the more prepared you’ll be during the actual interview.
 
Hiring managers appreciate candidates who demonstrate why they love their company. Genuinely demonstrate why you would rather work for them than anyone else.  Hiring managers never want to feel like they’re just another company you sent your resume to. Instead, they want to see that you’re genuinely interested in contributing to the growth of the company. If they sense you’re just looking for a wage slip, you won’t get one!
 
During the interview process, hiring managers want to know you did your “homework.” In other words, they want to see that you took the initiative to research their company, understand its unique challenges and demonstrate how you can help them get better.
 
This might all sound quite obvious but become very familiar with companies before you interview with them and during your interview, use what you’ve learned to demonstrate why you want to work for a particular company and what you can do to make it better.  Do this or otherwise you run the risk of looking like just another job seeker.
 
KHM Recruitment offers specialised support to all of our registered candidates and can provide help with updating or creating the CV, assistance with interview preparation and more.   

Published by Julie Jones
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Top Tips For A Career Change

KHM Recruitment
When you're stuck in a rut and dreading each day of work, a change of career seems to be the answer. The grass looks greener and the sky bluer. But is it? These ten crucial questions, answered honestly, will help you to think it through, evaluate your position and view the prospect with a steady gaze.


 

1. Why do you want to change?
Be clear about why you want to leave so that you don't jump out of the frying pan and into the fire. In my experience as a career and life coach, the most common reasons are:
  • You've been there too long and you're bored and stuck
  • You're no longer interested in the subject or the work
  • You're undervalued
  • Reorganisation and restructuring have changed your role
  • You're making no progress
  • You're too young to sit it out until you retire
  • You don't get on with your co-workers or your manager
  • A general need for change (some people need the stimulus of change in their lives more than others).
2. Do you really want to change career?
Think about whether it really is your career that you want to change. Be very specific about what you do and don't like about your current work - it may be your role, your boss, the working environment or your terms and conditions. Think about exactly what would make your working life more enjoyable. Make sure you explore all your options and don't rush the process. You may find that you can make a change in a less drastic way, for example:
  • Finding another job in the same sector (i.e. at another University or College if you are an academic)
  • Change sector (for example, move from the academic to the private sector/industrial research, the charity sector)
  • Modify your existing job (by going part-time and pursuing another interest, moving sideways, finding a secondment opportunity or getting involved in another project).
3. What kind of work do you want to do?
You may already have a good idea of what you want to do. Answering the first two questions may have helped clarify your needs. Now think about what your ideal job would entail on a day-to-day basis, for example:
  • less paperwork and admin
  • working with different kinds of people, fewer people or in a team rather than on your own
  • more or less direction, micro-management or support
  • more outdoor work, more or less travelling
  • working from home
  • working more flexibly
You may be able to negotiate these changes within your role at present. Your boss or manager may be able to help you with your problem, but you could make it easier for both of you if you already have some realistic and practical ideas. If you have an idea, write it down and approach your boss with it. Don't forget to include any benefits for your manager or the institution/organisation.

4. What are your skills and capabilities?
Think about your transferable skills and capabilities, aside from the specific subject or job area, for example:
  • organisational skills
  • teaching/lecturing
  • detailed research work
  • fundraising knowledge and ability
  • people skills
  • ideas and getting initiatives off the ground.
5. Do you want to use your existing skills and capabilities?
You may be thinking that you want a complete change, away from everything, but be sensible. Think about other roles or jobs where you can use the knowledge, skills and capabilities that you have built up. Talk to the people you work with to find out if there are opportunities associated with your work: suppliers, fellow project members or members of a professional association, if you belong to one, may give you ideas to explore. Sideways moves, consultancies and poacher-turned-gamekeeper jobs may be suitable.

6. What are you interested in?
When you're thinking about a new career, be sure that it is something you really are interested in. It may be that although your reasons for moving are financial, a fat salary may not be enough to keep you interested. The money may be right but remember that you will be doing this job day in day out. Does the remuneration offer enough of an incentive?

7. What are your values?
Even if you don't think that you have particularly hard-held values, you may be surprised - a disconnect between your everyday activity and what you believe in can be very uncomfortable. For instance, an academic who moves into a fast-paced commercial environment may find the bottom-line, profit-making approach and the way it affects every part of the work unacceptable. On the other hand, someone moving into academic life from the commercial sector may have difficulty with the gentler, less targeted approach of institutional life. Explore your values. Examples are:
  • doing good
  • making a difference
  • recognition for hard work and enterprise
  • status and importance (don't tell yourself it doesn't matter - it does! You may be able to deal admirably with working under a manager who is younger, and less experienced than you are. Even so, it's worth thinking about.)
  • being free to work without commercial constraints.
8. Are you prepared to retrain or start from the bottom again?
Of course, if you are already committed to a complete change, you will need to think of the implications for you and your family. You may have to start from square one again and live with all the consequences of that such as lack of status and lack of money!

9. How much money do you need to make?
Crucial! Are you prepared to drop your income level? Take a long hard look at you current finances and write it all down: outgoings, income, extra expenses. See where you can make cuts and get a very clear idea of exactly how much money you need to make over a year. Then do the same with any enterprise, new position or job.

10. Will you regret it if you don't?
The saying goes that you only regret what you didn't do. In two years time, five years time or 10 years time, will you regret not having made a change? 
 
 
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Thinking of Changing Your Career

KHM Recruitment
How often have you thought of changing your career?  For some people, especially those working in a ‘dying’ industry, changing careers is a necessity imposed upon them. For others changing jobs and careers is something that is almost as natural as breathing. By diversifying your work experience and learning new skills, you make yourself a more desirable candidate for future roles.

                               
 
However, to change careers successfully requires good research skills and honest self-appraisal. For example, it’s not enough to assume that just because you speak English, you can teach it or that because you’ve travelled extensively you can write travel articles for a national newspaper. For some careers you’ll also need to get specific qualifications, while for others you’ll need to develop particular skills. Here are seven steps for making a successful transition into a new career.

1. Understand the industry
If you’re making a transition from one industry into another, you’ll need to know that industry inside out. What are the challenges and the opportunities currently facing the sector? Who are the main players and the competitors? What market does the industry serve, and what are their typical needs and problems?  Obviously, this learning curve is easier if you transition into a sector related to the one you’re currently working in.

2. Learn about the role
What is the typical profile of a successful candidate in the role you are applying for? What experience, skills or qualifications are indispensable, or merely “desirable”?  There are various ways you can go about getting this information. The easiest and quickest is probably just to ask HR or the recruiter what the profile of an ideal candidate would be. Alternatively, you can search LinkedIn for the person already holding that job, then look at their previous experience and route into the role.

3. Know your skills
Be honest with yourself when you assess your personal strengths and weaknesses. It’s often worth asking someone close to you (such as a colleague or peer) their views too, as individual perceptions are rarely the same. By evaluating your workplace skills too (technical skills, communication skills etc) you should be able to work out where there are gaps between you and the “ideal candidate”.  If you’ve had a fair amount of experience in a different industry, demonstrate your transferable skills. This is particularly the case if you’re changing industry rather than function. For example, if you’re moving from one finance position to another, you’ll still be using the same core skills, although the industry you’re working in might be different.
In a recession where employers can select from a wide pool of candidates, you need to be able to demonstrate the relevance of your transferable skills – especially if you have little or no direct industry experience.

4. Focus your CV
Make sure that what you write resonates with the employer. At its simplest, this means using the key words of the job ad in your CV. It also means that you only include relevant information that shows you have the experience and skills to do the job. Show how your transferable skills are applicable, and find appropriate career highlights that illustrate your potential “fit” for the role.  Be mindful of any company or industry-specific language you use in your CV, as it may not translate well into different sectors. As with all successful communication, you need to focus what you write or say on your audience, and this means using the same terms as they do.

5. Target companies
Make a plan to approach companies you admire in the sector. Look at their websites, and research them and their employees on LinkedIn. If you know somebody there from either your first or second degree of contacts, ask them for information, or a referral to someone else at the company who can give you additional information.

6. Be prepared for a pay cut
If you’re going into a new sector, you may need to accept a lower salary. You may also only be offered short-term, contract or maternity cover work. These are all good ways to get your foot in the door, and once in, you’ll be better placed to learn the job and apply for internal promotions.

7. Be flexible in your thinking
What do you have that will be useful to a company? Why should a company employ you and not someone with years of experience in the industry? Being able to see what you can bring to the table from the employer’s point of view is perhaps the most important element to changing career successfully. If you have a way to solve some of the company’s most pressing problems, or if you know how to implement new systems and processes to save time, increase efficiency and profits, then you have a good chance of getting the ear of a potential employer. And this is as much the case for people who have a long work history as it is for those who enjoy challenging the status quo and thinking creatively.
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Interview Preparation In Five Basic Steps

KHM Recruitment
Interview Preparation In Five Basic Steps!
It’s not uncommon to need a bit of support when going through a career change, exploring a new role or going for the interview of your life for the job you so desperately want. Here are our tips to get you through that super tricky time!


                                                                                  


Our five basic steps to a successful, professional and thorough interview are...
 
1. PREPARATION – BEFORE THE INTERVIEW 
Preparation creates a pathway for a professional performance. You can prepare for an interview by following these three basic steps:
 
RESEARCH your company thoroughly by whatever means possible!  Nearly all organisations will have a website which will provide you with most of the information that you may need! Yes, it’s really that simple, just have a read and remember the key ethos that the company endeavours to deliver.
PREPARE a list of questions you would like to ask your prospective employer – during the interview you are under pressure trying hard to please and impress, and frequently this can have a counter-productive result! So, don’t let your mind go blank and be stumped at a hurdle where you have the chance to find out as much about the company as they have to find out about you!
SELLING yourself.  Have you asked yourself that one basic question... Why should that employer offer me that job? It’s important to display confidence but NOT arrogance. SELL yourself and give examples of where you have proved your ability or shown your skills within your specialist area. 
 
2. THAT ALL IMPORTANT FIRST IMPRESSION 
Once it’s done, you can’t go back - it’s not just about the hand shake, conducting positive body language and the attitude you give off – although these are VERY important. It’s also about the way you aesthetically present yourself – the outfit you pick and the shoes you chose to wear, how you are looking at an interview plays a big part in giving out a good first impression.
 
UNDERDRESS and you’ll look as if you’re not taking the role as seriously as you should. 
OVERDRESS and you’ll potentially stand out as a bad fit for them. 
 
SMART is good, if you go with something slightly smarter than the company’s everyday attire, you can’t really go too wrong, and if you’re not too sure, stick to neutral colours. 
STRUGGLING? You could even call ahead of time and ask for guidance from someone in their HR team, or take a nosey trip to the office or local branch of the business! 
 
THE FINAL GOLDEN RULE – arrive on time or preferably early, there may be forms to fill out, but if not it’s still important to arrive in good time. Don’t forget, make sure you bring a copy of your CV to refer to and to therefore avoid forgetting dates etc. 
 
3. CONTROLLING YOUR NERVES 
Don’t speak too fast! Nerves tend to make you speed up, so while you’re waiting for your interview, try and relax and reduce your breath speed.
 
BREATHE through your nose very slowly for a count of three, and breathe out your nose for a count of three. Repeating this exercise three times will help you lower your heart rate and reduce nerves to slow your speech – remember, pronunciation is key! 
LISTEN to the interviewer, and don’t rush to answer! When you’re full or fear and in full flight or fight mode, it’s harder to listen and often you answer the wrong question. So, slow down your body’s natural responses and listen, make sure you make the interviewer feel that you value their question. 
SHOWING YOUR HANDS has been proven to increase the likelihood of getting a job. If they are visible on the table in front of us rather than hiding under the table it shows a sign of honesty. 
 
4. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 
WAFFLING is a big NO! Answer the question directly and if the interviewer wants more information, they’ll ask for it!
 
KEEP YOUR ANSWERS TO THE POINT, and concise but make sure you don’t act too formally and robotic.

NEVER answer with ‘I don’t know’! If in doubt, ask that the interviewer repeats the question, and if you’re still struggling ask if you can get back to them via your recruitment consultant later.
ENHTHUSIASM definitely counts! Although you may be lacking a little of the criteria and experience that the interviewer is ultimately looking for, if you are enthusiastic, willing to learn and above all aren’t afraid of hard work, these messages must come across in your interview. This should satisfy the interviewer that you are the type of person they would like to recruit.
AT THE END of the interview, remember to ask your prepared questions, even if they have covered everything, at least go over some points they have mentioned. If there is anything you think of after the interview, don’t be afraid to call direct or get back to them via your recruitment consultant. 
 
5. CLOSING THE INTERVIEW
At the end of the interview, remember a firm hand shake is always a good way to end. If you are keen, let them know that you want the position, or would very seriously consider it. Don’t forget to thank them for their time and for explaining to you what they want from a candidate. Maintain your body language, and even if you feel the interview did not go particularly how you would have liked it, maintain the positive attitude you arrived with!
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Win Your Next Interview

KHM Recruitment
Let’s face it.  Interviews are tough.  You have a very limited time to show who you really are and what you are capable of.  As prepared as you might feel, there are so many potential questions that you could be asked and you need to have well rehearsed answers ready for all of them so you can speak comfortably and confidently about any one of the topics that might arise. 
 
There are some tried and tested strategies you can follow to help you stand out from the crowd and make a great impression however.  Follow them carefully and you will certainly do that. 

                                   
 
Know the Company
No matter how prepared you are to talk about yourself, your experience and your knowledge, if you do not know the background and the essentials of the company you’re interviewing for, it will only highlight a lack of preparation and interest. There is no way to show an interviewer how you see yourself fitting into a company if you know very little about it.   Take a long hard look at the company website and make sure you understand the very basics such as, how the company makes money, who the management team are  and what the company objectives and strategy is.  Google the company you are interviewing for and read up on the current news available.  Also, don’t forget to look at their Twitter and Facebook pages for up to date insights and the latest company information
 
Understand the Basics of the Job You’re Applying For
Make sure you have a complete and detailed understanding of the job that you’re applying for. Go beyond the job description.  Fully understand the position and imagine yourself performing every task that is required of you.  This will help during the interview when you talk about your past experiences and knowledge and give you a significant advantage over other candidates.
 
Know What Makes You A Great Fit For the Position
Have a complete understanding about what makes you fit into the position you are interviewing for and make sure you raise it during the interview. What makes you unique? It could be that you’re an ideas person or that you are fixated on statistics.  Whatever your special skills are, know them and prepare to fit them into your responses so when an interviewer asks, “What are your strengths?” you can skip the clichés and immediately talk about the qualities you have that are unique to the job. You’ll make it immediately clear that you are indeed, a perfect fit for the position.
 
Identify What Sets You Apart
Most companies interview a lot of people. So many, in fact, that they generally have to refer back to their notes to remember candidates—the exception being, candidates who have set themselves apart from all of the others. They may have done this by dressing a particular way or by having a strong and memorable personality.  The best way however is to have a good story that’s work-related.  If you can get the attention of an interviewer with a memorable story that illustrates what a strong candidate you are, you will be sure to place at the top of the list.
 
Prepare a List of Questions
Prepare a list of potential interview questions and highlight important points you will speak about if asked these questions. This preparation will make your responses more direct, avoid awkward silences and uncertainty, and it will build your confidence prior to the interview.
 
Practice, Practice and Then Practice Some More

You, and most likely, most of the other interviewees will already know the majority of questions you’ll be asked.  They don’t change and most companies will ask the same questions.  The difference lies in preparation. If you prepare unique and specific responses to the subject you will have the competitive edge over everyone else. You don’t need to memorise these answers, but make sure you know certain points of reference about yourself that you can apply to different questions.  Rehearse the interview in front of a mirror or better still, video your responses until you are able to speak confidently and comfortably.  Make sure to “interview” yourself. Video your responses until you’re able to speak easily and openly and this will pay off during the interview.
 
Relax
If you cannot relax during your interview, nothing you do to prepare will matter. It is essential to the selection process that you be yourself and if you are nervous it will show.  Fear or anxiety will be seen as a weakness compared to a relaxed smile and genuine confidence. Smiling not only increases your own confidence, but it also puts the people you’re interacting with at ease. Having this skill requires emotional intelligence or EQ which is a skill that more and more employers look for in a candidate.   
 
Be Positive
Maintaining positivity is essential in an interview, but it can be very difficult to do when discussing some topics. It’s hard to be positive when talking about difficult bosses or coworkers from your past employment, or having to explain why you were let go from your previous job, but that’s exactly what employers want to see in you. Show them that you can maintain a positive attitude about a challenging environment, and they’ll see the resilient and flexible individual they are looking for.
 
Be Honest
Good interviewers have a way of getting right to the heart of the person you are. Some have good instincts and some are simply very good at asking the right questions. It is important to approach your interview with honesty.  If you interview dishonestly, you’ll either not get the job or you’ll end up in a job that’s a poor fit.  Neither result is the one you are looking for so don’t focus on what you think the interviewer wants to hear. Give a strong, honest and passionate breakdown of what you have to offer.
 
The bottom line is this.  The more prepared and confident you are for your job interview, the better your chances of getting the job you want. 

Published by Julie Jones
 
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Returning To Work After Children Post 50 Part 2

KHM Recruitment
When I decided to put my career on hold eleven years ago so I could stay home and raise my children, I didn’t give a moment’s thought to how things would change.

Sixteen years of building a career and the social media platforms of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Flickr, YouTube, Slideshare and Pinterest did not even exist when I last worked in an office. I came from a time when marketing campaigns took time to execute and they usually took the form of TV ads, radio and press campaigns.  Planning was done months in advance and every element of a campaign scrutinised and debated before it went live.

                                            
 
Eleven years on and just considering a return, in any capacity, to the Marketing arena left me feeling completely and utterly overwhelmed.  How could I use platforms like Pinterest or Vyou in business? How do people actually utilise Facebook or any of the other platforms?  How has the use of smartphone video cams replaced the punchy little messages of yesterday? 
 
My CV was out of date, my skills were out of date and even my wardrobe was out of date.  I could not for the life of me see what I had to offer.  I thought long and hard for days, breaking down what it was I wanted to do.  How much did I really want to work? What were my childcare responsibilities? What support did I have available to me from my partner, family and friends?
 
I contacted various recruitment agencies, armed with my CV and faced rejection after rejection.  I trawled the online sites for any job that I thought I might be able to do and I sent off countless numbers of job applications.  Time and time again I received yet another ‘thank you, we have received applications from candidates with more recent experience’ and my already fragile self-confidence plummeted further.  My skills were not current, my need for flexible hours was against me, my past work experience just seemed to have happened too long ago.  Most of the companies I had worked for overseas and here in the UK were no longer operating so even references were unavailable.  It was an uphill battle to stay optimistic and my enthusiasm began to waver. 
 
I received a call one morning from KHM Recruitment who had seen my CV on a job board and I agreed to meet them for a coffee.  One coffee turned into three as we reviewed my CV, thought about my skills and how they should be presented and discussed ideas for renewing my job search.  Two hours later I returned home with a fresh understanding of what I needed to do. 
 
I had to start by regaining my confidence in myself.  I began by looking at my interests and my skills and I knew that I needed to begin by updating them.  I applied for and completed a course in Digital Marketing and I used the Internet for further research.  With renewed enthusiasm, I began to practice my career pitch.  I sat down and explained to my children that my decision to go back to work was not a rejection of them in any way and I involved them in the excitement of wanting to make the most of a part of myself that I had put on hold for a long time. 
 
I worked closely with KHM Recruitment as I researched my preferred jobs and industries familiarising myself with what the job required.  I reviewed relevant publications, started connecting with other people in the industry and acquainting myself with industry speak and new buzz words.  With the help of KHM Recruitment, I prepared for interviews that would question my career break by linking how this experience would support me going forward and highlighting my desire to take on new challenges.  I began to see that it was perfectly okay to take a career break.  There was no need to apologise or to make excuses for it.  I learned how to turn it into a positive and use it to my advantage. 
 
No longer overwhelmed or suffering from a fragile sense of self worth, I was once again the same capable person I was before my career break.  Just a little out of practice that’s all.

Published by Julie Jones
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Returning To Work After Children Post 50 Part 1

KHM Recruitment
Returning to work after taking time off to raise your children.  post 50.

Part One.

I was in my late 30’s, immersed in my career and deeply passionate about my work.  The thought of starting a family of my own wasn’t something that I had ever given serious consideration to.  Of course, I knew about women with families that worked and of those who chose to stay home and I was always convinced that I could, if necessary, and if faced with having to make the decision, have my career and my family too.  However, I wasn’t married, I worked until the early hours of the morning, travelled frequently and only rarely went out on dates.  I had spent the past sixteen years trying to prove myself in what was a male dominated business.  I was the quintessential career woman. 

                                   
 
The year I turned 40 I had begun regularly dating a man and although it wasn’t planned, we discovered to our mutual joy that we were about to start a family of our own and after the fastest nine months ever, we welcomed into our lives a beautiful baby girl.  One year, two weeks later, we celebrated the birth of our second child, another baby girl.    
 
I was 41 years old when I made the decision to quit my job as a Director of a small but growing company to be a full time mother to my two children.  I knew that there was no way for me to continue in my current role and be home to raise my children as well, and I also knew that staying home to raise my girls was exactly what I wanted to do.  I had thought long and hard about my decision and I knew that having waited so long to become a mother, I just could not accept having to leave my children in someone else’s care whilst I returned to work.  I was in the fortunate position to have the support of my partner who felt as I did, that our children would benefit more from having one of their parents at home to raise them. 
 
Fast forward eleven years.  My children are finishing primary school and I had devoted every moment of those eleven years to being there for them.  From every school play, assembly, after school activity, music performance, parent consultation, fever, heartbreak, days off from school, doctor and dentist appointments, school trips, PTA meetings, sleepless nights and play dates.  Now the real challenge was about to begin as I realised that I hadn’t completely thought things through. 
 
I had made the decision to remove myself from the workforce for an extended period of time and I had utilised my 16 years of training and all of the skill sets I possessed to running my household.  From balancing budgets, to organising my family’s diverse schedule, I inspired, I gave direction, I led with positive encouragement and sometimes with strong words and I resolved a whole host of conflicts, all of which were intensely important at the time.  Now here I was.  Ready and willing to ‘go back to work’ or rather get back to paid work outside of the home and I suddenly find myself faced with a daunting and frightening reality; I had not been employed for eleven years and I was over the age of 50.  Lacking in confidence, up to date skills, knowledge, experience and ideas.  I felt unemployable.  

Published by Julie Jones
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How Important is the CV

KHM Recruitment
Companies will review an average of 21 candidate CV’s before extending an offer for an accounting or finance role but some firms will review, on average 100 CV’s before making a job offer.
 
These facts highlight the importance many employers still place on traditional CV’s and candidates need to seek the advice of recruitment companies on how to sell themselves on paper and stand out in the face of fierce competition. 

                                 
 


Ten times more finance professionals look at the candidate’s skills and experience before they review the qualifications and education listed on CV’s so candidates should focus on showcasing their expertise if they want to stand out.
 
About a quarter of those recruiting accounting and finance professionals look at the average length of stay at each previous employer first.  Lots of short stays at multiple companies can be seen as a negative with many recruiters.
 
Job titles are incredibly relevant and can determine their perceived standing in the job market.  Candidates should not underestimate the importance of listing every role held within a company as it will give a clearer indication of how your career has progressed within that organisation.
 
Many people fail to put enough emphasis on detailing their achievements and if you want your CV to stand out, it’s important to be clear on how you contributed and where you added value in previous roles. 
 
KHM Recruitment is happy to provide all candidates that walk in their door with an honest appraisal of their CV, skills, salary expectations as well as current market conditions.  Providing career direction as necessary with suggestions on how to further develop already established skills is just part of the service offered because KHM believes it’s necessary if candidates are to matched with roles that suit them. 
 
Email info@khmrecruitment.co.uk today to find out how we can help you. 
 
KHM Recruitment.  Uniting talent with opportunity. 

Published by Julie Jones
 
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Stand Out From The Crowd

KHM Recruitment
Whether it’s through your CV or during the interview, it is important that you stand out from the crowd.  Spend some time thinking about your specific qualifications or experience that will make you more employable than other candidates and then talk about them.

 



Do your research.  What makes the company ‘tick’? Ensure you have a good understanding of the company that you are applying to work for.  Spend time looking at the products and services they offer as well as how it competes in the marketplace.  This will allow you to highlight why you would make a good addition to the company and any prospective employer will see that you have put time and thought into your preparation. Not putting in this time could make for an awkward (and unsuccessful interview).

                                           


Be confident but don’t oversell yourself as you will get found out eventually. Be clear, concise and focused.  Remember that listening to the views of others is a skill in itself so don’t underestimate the importance of listening to the views of others as it will demonstrate your ability to understand where the other person is coming from so that you can both get what you want and feel positive about it.

 



Highlight your ability to be logical and analytical when it comes to problem solving or resolving issues but demonstrate ways to approach problems from different angles.  Show that you can prioritise and work efficiently.  Even if you are not applying for a leadership position, it will always be an advantage if you can show that you have the potential to motivate, delegate and lead by good example.

Initiative, team player, proactive, dynamic, self motivated.  These words are key to catching an employer's interest. Mention them in your CV and at interviews and see how impressed they are with your business-speak (but don't go overboard or you'll sound daft). 

Ultimately, the best advice is to get your foot in the door somewhere.  It does not have to be the most well-paid or the job of your dreams.  The best time to apply for a job is when you already have one.  This will always give you so much more leverage.  By implementing some of these strategies, you should stand a much stronger chance of standing out in a competitive job market.  Remember, you are your own brand. Don’t be intimidated by the job description. All employers need value. Do your research. Be nice and be bold!

Published by Julie Jones

 

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Valentines Day Career Advice

KHM Recruitment
Valentine's Day is almost upon us and for those of you looking to embark on a new career path, the search for your new job is not so different from the search for your perfect partner.

Are you turning around in circles looking for jobs that seem tomatch your skill set or CV and coming up blank?  Is that perfect job you are seeking simply not out there?
 
 
When you are looking for that perfect person and your usual approach to dating has been unsuccessful, what do you do? You look elsewhere of course!  You develop new interests and hobbies, meet some new people you think might help with some new introductions or you change your local hang-out.  The same approach that you would use for dating can be applied to your job search by expanding your search to include other sectors, even other industries, that might be able to take advantage of your existing skills and perhaps offer an opportunity to develop new ones!

Pull out your CV, take a look at your skills and past experience and think about how they can fit in fields outside of those you have been putting all of your focus on.  You may be surprised by what you come up with and any prospective employer will surely see the new perspective on your job search as a positive.

When we go out on a date and it doesn't live up to our expectations, do we simply give up and vow to spend all of our future Saturday nights alone in front of the TV or do we brush ourselves off and embrace the 'plenty of fish in the sea' attitude and get back out out there?  Job hunting is no different.  Of course it is disappointing to have an unsuccessful interview but that doesn't necessarily mean that you are unsuited for that particular field.  Use every unsuccessful interview or placement as an opportunity to learn and to improve your interview technique and seek out other related positions with the knowledge that one of them will prove to be the right match for you.

At KHM Recruitment, we are committed to placing you in a role that perfectly suits your talents and your personality.  We can provide career direction with suggestions on how to develop your skills. Our trained consultants will offer an honest appraisal of your CV, skills, salary expectations and also the current market conditions.  KHM Recruitment specialises in finding the right roles for our candidates because we believe a company can only become truly great by hiring great people. 

Whether you are job hunting or dating, it is all about the perfect match so call the team at KHM Recruitment on 01763 248337 or send us an email at info@khmrecruitment.co.uk to find out how we can help you today.

It really is that simple..

Published by Julie Jones
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The Top 10 New Years Resolutions for Career Success in 2016

KHM Recruitment
New Year, new start and all that. For a lot of us, the beginning of a new year is the force we need to kick us into action and to encourage us to adopt a proactive attitude towards achieving our goals.

Though New Years resolutions are commonly focused on getting fit or picking up a new hobby; a large number of people aspire to make changes at work and take steps to give their career a much-needed boost.

Here are some of the most common career related New Years resolutions that people make from year to year. Are any of these on your To Do list for 2016?



1) Get a promotion
A lot of us may be dreaming of getting a promotion, but it won’t happen if you just sit back and do the bare minimum. In order to be considered for a pay-rise or promotion you will have to prove your worth in the company and demonstrate what you could bring to the new role. Talk to your manager to build an idea of what you have to work on and what steps you can take to make yourself promotion ready in the New Year.

2) Quit your job
If your job is getting you down, or you feel like you’ve hit a brick wall in your current role, it may be time to find something new. There’s no point sticking with something if it is truly making you unhappy and there’s bound to be an opportunity waiting around the corner for you that will be a much better fit. Take the time to figure out exactly what you want to do and what you want from a job and then take the appropriate actions to give your job search a kick start in the right direction.

3) Be more organised
There’s nothing more stressful than getting into the office in the morning and not having a clue what you’re supposed to be working on, or where you can find it! Use the New Year to get everything in order, so that you can manage your time efficiently and always know exactly where you are with certain tasks. A good place to start is by tidying your desk, removing any unnecessary clutter that could become a distraction and by making good use of a diary or calendar to keep track of daily happenings.

4) Network more
You know deep down that networking can open so many doors, yet you’ve kind of put it on the back burner over the last year. Now’s your chance to turn this around and make some new contacts who could lead to exciting opportunities in the new year. Become more active on LinkedIn and other social networks, attend industry events and arrange meetings or a coffee with old contacts to touch base. You can get the ball rolling by checking out what events are coming up over the next few month and popping them in your diary early.

5) Learn a new skill
No matter how old you are or how long you have been in your career for, it’s never too late to learn something new and expand on your skill set. Identify an area that you would like to improve in, or a certain skill you would like to learn and book yourself into classes or teach yourself using online tutorials, etc.

6) Undertake further training
As I said before, it’s never too late. If you regret not getting a degree or training in a certain area earlier in life, what’s stopping you now? There are plenty of low-cost and flexible training opportunities on the market, which can be completed full time, or in your free time. Alternatively, a lot of companies are willing to fund further training for their employees if they can see the benefits for their personal work performance and the business as a whole.

7) Say yes to scary opportunities
A lot of us are guilty of turning down great career opportunities on the basis that they scared us. By turning down these opportunities, you aren’t allowing yourself the chance to gain valuable experience and improve your skills in that area. After all, you may find that it’s not that scary after all, you just need to learn to grab the bull by the horns. Make 2016 the year of saying yes!

8) Set yourself goals and make a plan
If you feel like you haven’t achieved what you would have liked to this year, avoid making the same mistake next year by setting yourself some clear goals, making a plan  about how you’re going to achieve them and then sticking to it! Sure this may be easier said than done and a lot of new year’s resolutions go out the window after a week or so, but if you make it realistic and remind yourself why you’re doing it from time to time, I’m sure you can maintain motivation!

9) React proactively to criticism
It’s only natural to become defensive when somebody criticises your work or the way that you are doing something, but you’re unlikely to achieve much from reacting in this way and you never know, they may even have a point! In the future, if people offer their feedback, whether it be positive or negative, hear them out and see how you can take on board their advice.

10) Create a good work-life-balance
Not only does striking a good work-life balance have the obvious benefits on your personal life, it can also greatly improve your wellbeing at work and job satisfaction. Giving yourself a decent amount of downtime, as well as committing yourself to your job during work hours means that you can excel in your career, at the same time as staying healthy and maintaining a good social life.

[Image Credit: Shutterstock]

First published by: http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/top-career-new-years-resolutions/
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How to Ensure Your Social Media Platforms are Employer Ready

KHM Recruitment
We all have photos from a couple of years back at University or College that we really wish we could simply delete in one quick press of a button. But the laboriously long process of searching through the years of awful pictures we can't bear to see again and deleting each photo and post individually makes us want to hurl just as much. It may be easier to make a new account, but realistically you may be in a new position in your life with lots of contacts and new memories you wish to keep hold of 



When applying for a new role, one of the most important features of your first impression is no longer your physical appearance or just your CV. It is your online presence that can captivate a prospective employer and in one fail swoop could blemish your outstanding professional profile that will instantly be out of the running, from what seemed to you as a small insignificant wind up hacking from a friend that may have happened years ago, or a hungover photo of you asleep at a lecture, or your head stuck down a toilet.
 
These silly little irrespective parts of your life can be the one and only thing that ruins all the hard work put into studying for A Levels, Degrees and Courses to get you the dream job you so desperately wanted. An awesome new app that is perfect for sprucing up your profiles this New Year and removing any cobwebs left behind called 'Forget Me Do’ has just recently appeared online.
 
This app is all you need to regain control of your online privacy, and we love it. Even if you do, privately, want to keep hold of the images, say for sentimental value, you can keep a copy of your data by downloading your information. The app software tool helps you to destroy the link between your profile and the data that you no longer want anyone else to see.

Generally speaking it is also important to have your Social Media profile on a private setting, to stop any unwanted viewers peering in and to secure your information. You can then view your requests and decide appropriately who you would like to see your posts and updates.

Published by Jessica Smyth

Find the Forget me Do app at https://forgetmedo.com

 
...
2017
September
How to survive job rejection
(20/09/17)
February
New Director joins KHM
(28/02/17)
2016
December
Hello Monday
(12/12/16)
November
Social Media And The Job Hunter
(21/11/16)
When Its Time For A Career Change
(11/11/16)
Turning An Anxious Job Seeker Into An Interview Pro
(03/11/16)
September
The Fine Art Of Balancing Work Children And Family Life
(19/09/16)
How The Job Search Has Changed
(06/09/16)
April
What Hiring Managers Are Looking For
(29/04/16)
Top Tips For A Career Change
(17/04/16)
March
Thinking of Changing Your Career
(30/03/16)
Interview Preparation In Five Basic Steps
(21/03/16)
Win Your Next Interview
(14/03/16)
Returning To Work After Children Post 50 Part 2
(08/03/16)
Returning To Work After Children Post 50 Part 1
(03/03/16)
How Important is the CV
(02/03/16)
February
Stand Out From The Crowd
(24/02/16)
Valentines Day Career Advice
(10/02/16)
January
The Top 10 New Years Resolutions for Career Success in 2016
(04/01/16)
2015
December
How to Ensure Your Social Media Platforms are Employer Ready
(21/12/15)
Five last-minute Secret Santa gifts
(16/12/15)
What Does a Resume Look Like for Santa...
(08/12/15)
5 Ways to Spruce Up Your Resume for the New Year
(07/12/15)
How Not to Get Fired by Alan Sugar on The Apprentice
(04/12/15)
November
How to Write a Resume With No Experience
(30/11/15)
What recruiters are really looking for in your CV
(24/11/15)
Top Tips to Save Money Before Christmas
(18/11/15)
6 Super Smooth Job Hunting Tips... James Bond Style!
(17/11/15)
Top 4 Resume Tips for Job Seekers
(16/11/15)
UK Recruiters Reveal Most Challenging Roles to Fill
(06/11/15)